Skip to content
Visually Impaired Link
Two Generations of Professional Custom Services
 


Development of the Motility Implants

Development of motility type implants began to transpire when a number of concerned eye surgeons experimented with medical grade plastics and other compatible materials that would not only replace lost orbital volume, but would simultaneously offer movement to an overlying eye prosthesis.  It was at this stage that orbit volume augmentation became a partner with a number of non-spherical designed motility implants that were:  basket (ball and socket) shaped, Saturn styled with an attached ring, pyramidal, conical, pear shaped, hemispherical with a flat anterior and even quadruple nubbins on the front surface.  All of these implants were solid avascular type implants, some of which relied on imbrication of the severed recti through tunnels and posts for their attachment.  Whereas, others had an external wrapping of tantalum or other non-allergic mesh material for integration of the eye muscles.

Two of the more innovative implants went another step further, one incorporated magnets in both the implant and prosthesis, while the other made a positive contact by having the anterior surface of the implant exposed with a rectangular cavity for insertion of a pegged prosthesis.  This peg innovation from the late 1940's may have been the precipitant for a secondary option for the present day popular porous (coral and polyethylene) implants that integrate the rectus muscles for motility.  Then, after four to six months of fibrovascularization of tissues throughout the implant, an option is available for drilling a hole for a pegged prosthetic attachment.  This would increase mobile response for quick darting eye movements.

  

 

   
Home
Help

About Us
History

Procedures
Results

Directions
Contact Us

FAQ
Glossary

Publications

   
Copyright © 2000-2017 Jahrling OPI All Rights Reserved
Terms of Use
   
Designed by Vivax Corporation
   
Updates by Drew Mather
   
 
Jahrling Ocular Prosthetics, Incorporated
50 Staniford Street, Boston, MA  02114, USA
Members American Society of Ocularists, Board Certified Ocularists